All posts by Neil

Edge Beveling of Interior Doors

WHY SHOULD AN INTERIOR DOOR BE BEVELED?

The first step in hanging a door into an existing jamb is to bevel the edge. Edge beveling is not absolutely mandatory but it is highly recommended because it makes for a high quality installation. Beveling a door is the process of shaping the leading edge of the door at an angle. The bevel is usually 2 to 3 degrees and is done the entire length of the door on the lock side. The reason for beveling is to allow for a tighter fit of the door to the jamb when in the closed position (see illustration below).

Note that many of our doors are supplied already factory beveled, usually on both sides for reversibility.

When a door swings open or closed there is a radius or arc created by the path of the door. When closing a non-beveled door the leading edge will be closer to the outside corner edge of the jamb than the trailing edge. By machining a bevel on the lockset side of the door both the leading edge and the trailing edge of the door will be the same distance away from the corner edge of the jamb when opening and closing the door. This allows for a tighter fit when the door is in the closed position.

1/8″ clearance is recommended between the edge of the door and the edge of the jamb when the door is in the closed position. Any closer than that and you could have problems during humid conditions when the door swells in width and any  more than 1/8, the lockset bolt may not reach the strike plate during very dry conditions when the door shrinks in width.

The reason for beveling the edge of interior doors

GARDEN DOOR DEALS

FRENCH and GARDEN PATIO DOOR DEALS

Sorry, we are temporarily out of stock of French patio doors
Let us quote to build it to your specifications!

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GENERAL FEATURES OF OUR IN-STOCK FRENCH and GARDEN PATIO DOOR DEALS:

  • In-stock French patio doors may be surplus, seconds, scratch ‘n dent, etc.
  • Door frame may be 4 5/8″ or 6 5/8″ deep.
  • All doors fully insulated, weatherstripped, complete with sill and hinges
  • Finish frame heights can vary, usually between 79″ to 82″
  • Finish frame widths can vary, usuallly between 58″ to 74″
  • Both doors can swing in, with removable centre post (“astragal”)
  • Handles sold separately
  • All doors include tempered, standard insulating glass
Steel Insulated French Patio Door Clear Glass

FULL CLEAR LOW-E LITES
Our most popular door!

15-LITE LOW-E
FRENCH STYLE-Internal Grille

French patio garden door with vents and screens

VENTING GLASS, LOW-E
WITH FLY-SCREENS

French Garden Patio Door with Miniblinds

INTERNAL TILT & LIFT
MINI-BLINDS, LOW-E

Glass upgrades and many other designs are available. Please inquire.

CONDENSATION ON WINDOWS-CAUSES AND CURES

CONDENSATION ON WINDOWS: CAUSES AND CURES

Understanding Condensation on Windows

Ever wonder why condensation forms on your windows, and what you can do to prevent it?
Under certain conditions, condensation can form on the exterior or on the interior panes of dual insulating glass.
The Frequently Asked Questions and Answers below will give you a better understanding of condensation, and how it can be minimized.

Minor Condensation on Window Glass

Shown: a moderate amount of condensation on interior glass pane

About Interior Pane Condensation:

Q: What causes condensation to form on the interior glass of my windows?

A: Whenever there is excess humidity in a home, it manifests itself in the form of condensation on very cold surfaces which, in winter, will be your window glass.  The warmer the air in your home, the more moisture it will retain. When this moist air comes in contact with your relatively cold window glass, it is quickly cooled, resulting in droplets of water.

Q: Do windows themselves cause condensation?

A: No, condensation is not the fault of the window. All window surfaces except for the glass are at a relatively warm temperature. Even the best insulating glass is still the weakest link in the insulation chain of any window. In fact, replacement of old drafty windows and doors with new, better sealing units reduces air flow through the home, making it tighter, and so able to retain more moisture.

Q: Where on a window does condensation normally form, and why?

A: Condensation always begins to form at the bottom of the glass pane.  This happens because when the warm (and moist) air from the room contacts the cold glass surface, it begins to cool. Cool air tends to fall and by the time it hits the bottom of the glass it has cooled enough to condense. This has a cumulative effect.

Major Condensation On Window Glass

Shown: a severe amount of condensation on interior glass pane

What Can I Do About It?

#1: Control the humidity levels in the home and increase air movement!
How?

  1. Use exhaust fans in the high humidity areas: kitchen, bathroom, laundry room
  2. Clothes dryers and gas burners must be vented to the outdoors
  3. Use furnace or room humidifiers sparingly, if at all.
  4. Ventilating louvers in attic, basement, and crawl spaces must be open and correctly sized
  5. Keep fireplace dampers open at all times during winter to allow moisture laden air to escape. (Warm air naturally rises)
  6. Air out your home a few minutes each day

#2: Upgrade the glass in your windows

If your windows are mechanically good but use regular insulating glass, upgrade to warmer, Low-e coated glass, with “Warm Edge Spacer” technology. Windows with standard glass used a thermally-conducting aluminum spacer (separating the two panes of glass), around the perimeter. This resulted in very cold glass temperatures at the glass edges, making the condensation problem worse.  Today, we use thermally insulated spacers resulting in a much warmer glass surface at the edge, resulting in reduced tendencies towards condensation.
We can supply this superior replacement insulating glass! Details HERE

No condensation on window glass

Reduce humidity in your home and upgrade your glass for a crystal clear view all year long!